Njord a Honorary Member of the Aesir in Norse Mythology 2017-04-29T14:50:39+00:00

Njord in Norse Mythology

Njord (Old Norse Njörðr) is the God of the wind, seafarers, coasts, inland waters and wealth, he is a member of the Vanir. When the war between the Vanir and the Aesir ended, Njord and two others, were sent to the Aesir as a token of truce, in return the Aesir sent Honir and Mimir to the Vanir. Njord lives in a house on the seashore in Asgard, which he called Noatun “Ship Haven”.

Njord is married to the giantess Skadi, Njord has a sister by the name Nerthus, together with his sister they have two children Freya and Freyr. Njord is often mistaken for the god of the sea, though this conception is incorrect because that is the God Ægir.

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“Njörd’s desire of the Sea” by W. G. Collingwood (1908)

Njord, Skadi and Nerthus

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“Njörðr, Skaði, and Freyr as depicted in The Lovesickness of Frey” by W. G. Collingwood (1908)

Njord had Freya and Freyr with his sister Nerthus. But the Aesir would not tolerate a marriage between Njord and his sister. So Njord got married with Skadi, a giantess. As the story goes Skadi picked Njord as her husband because of his beautiful feet, but they could not agree on where to live. Njord thought that the home of Skadi in the land of the giants was to cold and abandoned. While Skadi didn’t like the noise and the hustle of shipbuilding around Njords home, Noatun in Asgard. After nine nights at each place, they decided to live by them self.

Skadi went back to her favorite interest to hunt on skis, and Njord returned back to his house Noatun in Asgard. The seemingly unbridgeable gap between them, in all likelihood reflects more their personal tastes. Njord was certainly seen as a fertility God, assuring safe travel by sea, for those who worship him. But also for riches and good luck, in the form of land and sons. Skadi’s circumstance was quite another, she came from the mountains and snowy areas. Where heavy clouds hid the sun and the hard rock made the ground feel dead and cold.